Sofa/Console Table: Part III

It’s finished!!!!! I built a sofa table and it’s finished and I’m ridiculously excited about it! Tim provided support and some guidance and suggestions, but this baby was 95% me. I’ll start with a finished picture because I wouldn’t want to make you wait til the end of the post (told you I’m excited) and then back-up for some in-progress pictures.

I’m not great with decorating, but here is my first go at it. May try a few different versions of table decorations over the next few weeks.

Okay, in the last post, I had made it as far as the assembling the table top. Took advantage of a nice day between polar vortex and snow/ice storm to get moving on next steps. Trimming it down to size was interesting and super stressful. I started with the table top upside down, so I could follow the plywood, but the circular saw blade was rubbing on the plywood and the track was catching on the nail heads. This is one of the times Tim had to really talk it through to help me figure it out. THANK YOU, TIM!!

Flipped it over, marked the plywood edges on the sides of the herringbone pieces and lined up the track.

Once I was finished with the circular saw, which I’m slowly getting better at using, I cut/glued the remaining small pieces. Before I added the frame around the outside of the table top, and attached it to the base, I sanded it again and stained it first. I used the Oaked Stain from Weatherwash, and had planned to use the White Maintenance Oil, but loved the stain color so much I opted to go with the clear oil. Due to the crazy weather, and the state of the garage, I moved everything to the basement where the lighting is not optimal.

So pretty! I added the Clear Maintenance Oil, which deepened the colors. Oiled sections on the right in the picture below.

I will say, once again, that I’m not sure I understand assembly before staining. I realize it’s nice to know if it’s going to look good/correct once it’s all together, but it sure makes finishing a supreme pain. I used a teeny tiny brush to reach in between the bottom shelf slats. Pretty sure I’m going to go back to finishing all of the pieces first for the next project, even if it’s wrong.

The Shanty-2-Chic plans I followed for the base called for wheels on the bottom. Tim and I weren’t interested in wheels, so we did some internet searching and came up with an alternative. We love how these look as part of the finished piece (thank goodness).


Here is a picture from the other direction with a good view of the feet.

Well, that was probably more than you wanted to know about my first table build. Maybe it should have been a 4 part post. I learned so darn much through this process and I can’t wait to try it all out again, and to use what I’ve learned on new projects. Thanks for following along on this journey with me!

Oh, and something super fun happened when I posted on Instagram yesterday! I tagged Brandi at Eternal Harvest Decor in my comments to thank her for inspiring me to try a herringbone table top and for her youtube instructional video and she posted my table in her stories!

This is illustrative of the support I’ve seen in the Instagram woodworking community. On top of this, the amazing comments I’ve received from you all on Instagram and Facebook make me feel grateful and I appreciate it.

Smaller Pieces Out of Wood

As promised, late, but getting done, I wanted to share pictures of some of the smaller pieces I’ve been working on. I had a bunch of leftover 1x4s from the bed, and some leftover 1×12 from the nightstands since I didn’t use it for the bottom shelves. I used it for the following, using inspiration from some of the AMAZING woodworkers I follow online and on Instagram.

Completely unrelated is that my phone died. I lost some pictures, unfortunately, and I’m not quite over the learning hump with the new phone. I’m figuring out that some of the pictures I took with the new phone are on a super small setting and are blurring a little when I make them larger. Sorry, it’s not your eyes, it’s the pictures.

Here are pieces ready to be Weatherwashed for two trays, a centerpiece box, a wine tote and a beer tote.

Below is one of the many display ideas I tried in a tray photo shoot.

Here is the centerpiece box. I have battery operated pillar candles that I can picture in there with seasonal additions.

I also built a Shanty-2-Chic inspired wine rack. I used the Weatherwash Pined and Clear Maintenance Oil (I used it on the box above and the Rusted stain on the tray). I woodburned two designs, three of one and two of the the other.

Lots of pocket hole action using the Kreg jig.

Final product (with a very rare blue sky background)!

And something really, really exciting is my early Hanukkah, Christmas, Anniversary present. After a TON of research and review reading, I now own pretty RIDGID Power Tools! Still a few I want to add to the collection, but woooooooot!!!