Sofa/Console Table: Part III

It’s finished!!!!! I built a sofa table and it’s finished and I’m ridiculously excited about it! Tim provided support and some guidance and suggestions, but this baby was 95% me. I’ll start with a finished picture because I wouldn’t want to make you wait til the end of the post (told you I’m excited) and then back-up for some in-progress pictures.

I’m not great with decorating, but here is my first go at it. May try a few different versions of table decorations over the next few weeks.

Okay, in the last post, I had made it as far as the assembling the table top. Took advantage of a nice day between polar vortex and snow/ice storm to get moving on next steps. Trimming it down to size was interesting and super stressful. I started with the table top upside down, so I could follow the plywood, but the circular saw blade was rubbing on the plywood and the track was catching on the nail heads. This is one of the times Tim had to really talk it through to help me figure it out. THANK YOU, TIM!!

Flipped it over, marked the plywood edges on the sides of the herringbone pieces and lined up the track.

Once I was finished with the circular saw, which I’m slowly getting better at using, I cut/glued the remaining small pieces. Before I added the frame around the outside of the table top, and attached it to the base, I sanded it again and stained it first. I used the Oaked Stain from Weatherwash, and had planned to use the White Maintenance Oil, but loved the stain color so much I opted to go with the clear oil. Due to the crazy weather, and the state of the garage, I moved everything to the basement where the lighting is not optimal.

So pretty! I added the Clear Maintenance Oil, which deepened the colors. Oiled sections on the right in the picture below.

I will say, once again, that I’m not sure I understand assembly before staining. I realize it’s nice to know if it’s going to look good/correct once it’s all together, but it sure makes finishing a supreme pain. I used a teeny tiny brush to reach in between the bottom shelf slats. Pretty sure I’m going to go back to finishing all of the pieces first for the next project, even if it’s wrong.

The Shanty-2-Chic plans I followed for the base called for wheels on the bottom. Tim and I weren’t interested in wheels, so we did some internet searching and came up with an alternative. We love how these look as part of the finished piece (thank goodness).


Here is a picture from the other direction with a good view of the feet.

Well, that was probably more than you wanted to know about my first table build. Maybe it should have been a 4 part post. I learned so darn much through this process and I can’t wait to try it all out again, and to use what I’ve learned on new projects. Thanks for following along on this journey with me!

Oh, and something super fun happened when I posted on Instagram yesterday! I tagged Brandi at Eternal Harvest Decor in my comments to thank her for inspiring me to try a herringbone table top and for her youtube instructional video and she posted my table in her stories!

This is illustrative of the support I’ve seen in the Instagram woodworking community. On top of this, the amazing comments I’ve received from you all on Instagram and Facebook make me feel grateful and I appreciate it.

Sofa/Console Table: Part II

After a few days of Spring, the Winter weather has returned to Central PA. We made the most of the post-polar vortex reprieve and got much of the drywall up in the garage.I loved being able to get outside early enough that we could watch the tail end of the sunrise.

The whole back wall is now done and only a third of a sheet is left to do by the garage door.

The console/sofa table has been an experience. It will apparently take three parts to really share the experience of making it. Part II is focused on how much harder it was to get the pieces of wood lined up in the herringbone pattern than I anticipated. First, Fargo and I got the round 1 sanding done, and I didn’t even have a coat on!

Once the sanding was completed, I had some interesting hours. It was all fun and games when I was just laying the pieces of wood out to make sure I cut enough. Actually lining them up so that the centers didn’t travel off to one side of the plywood or the other was a different story.

I used clamps on two pieces in the middle. I then lined the rest of the boards in place above and below. It was so frustrating that I had to walk away for a bit and come back to it. It would definitely have been easier if I had just cut the angle on the center edges and lined them up on the middle line. This way, not only did I need to line it up even from both edges, but the tilt had to be correct as well.

Once I FINALLY got to the point where it was as centered as possible, I tightly clamped the two middle pieces in order to permanently affix them in place and use them as a guide. I actually flipped the board over, nailed those two pieces from the bottom, crossed my fingers and began the glue-up process.

As an extra measure to secure the herringbone pieces to the plywood, I nailed all of them to the board from the back. I honestly have no idea if that was a good idea, or not, but I was just too nervous they would fall off.

Now that all but the smallest pieces are attached, I’m hoping to use the circular saw today (once temps get into the 20s) to trim the herringbone pieces to the size of the plywood. I’ll then use the scraps for the remaining open spots. Hoping the circular saw and I get along well.

In between, I’m still doing yoga (and Fargo is still fighting me for the mat), and I’m still stopping to take some pictures (mostly from indoors). Had a pileated woodpecker stop by the back yard.

I’m ready to get the final sanding on the table done and start staining it. I submitted my table project to the Weatherwash Brand Ambassador program and it was accepted, which I’m pretty excited about. They sent me the Oaked Stain, White Maintenance Oil and Satin Varnish for free to use on the table in exchange for some social media postings and pictures to help with their company promotion. Given that I started using their products for the bed and nightstands and how much I love the results, it’s super cool to be working with them on the table.

Okay, wish me luck!

Sofa/Console Table: Part I

As I type, the crazy winter winds are blowing and pairing up with the crazy polar vortex temperatures. I’m very grateful to be indoors right now, working on a blog post (assuming we don’t lose power). I’m also working on a blog post because the weather conditions are preventing me from working on my current project…a sofa/console table.

I’m still using construction grade lumber “soft” woods, with edges in the slightly rounded condition in which they come. I do this partly because I can with these types of builds, but mostly because I like the rustic look it provides. As my skills improve, I plan to try working with more hard wood varieties, especially if I can find local sources for reclaimed lumber.

The table I’m building is mostly based off of this Shanty-2-Chic plan. The place I’m diverging from the plan is the table top. I was able to get the pieces for the main structure cut and first round sanded last week. Here is what it looks like so far.

Fargo, as always, watching, and inspecting the work.

After watching a bunch of tutorial videos, including this one from Eternal Harvest Decor, I decided I wanted to attempt a herringbone table top. As an aside, I follow Brandi, of Eternal Harvest Decor, on Instagram and she is a talented woodworker and a hoot. Luckily, I was able to use the driveway workshop on Monday and started cutting the 1x3s for the top.

It took me a few minutes to really get the hang of how the pieces of wood were going to be laid out. I’m really excited now that I have this started (imagine the 13.5″ x 51″ plywood underneath is cut out). I had to stop due to frozen fingers and toes, but you can get the idea.

I’m really proud of myself because I used the circular saw, by myself, and cut the plywood. I even did a freaking good job! I know it’s not as powerful as the corded circular saw we have, but this Ridgid cordless saw is so much quieter (i.e. less scary) and it cut super smoothly.

I’m planning to try a different Weatherwash aging stain on the table, it’s called Oaked. I’ve done some test pieces and I like it with the Clear Oil I’ve used on all of the other builds, and with the White Maintenance Oil which is also new to me.

Okay, now to the non-woodworking part of the post. I’ve stuck with the 30 Day Dedicate Yoga with Adriene program, completing Day 29 today. I really enjoy the 20 minutes (=/-) each day, as does Fargo, who tries to steal my mat. How am I supposed to argue with that face?!?

I do chuckle some mornings when Adriene is wearing a tank top, and I am trying to decide what is the perfect number of layers to have on.

In addition, we’ve continued to have some lovely Winter scenes, as long as one is indoors, that I’ve tried to capture.

I’m hoping to finish building the table this weekend, as we’re supposed to have more “normal” Winter conditions by then. I will jump for joy if it turns out like I have it pictured in my head, or at least reasonably close. Also, we were able to squeeze a trip for drywall in between snow showers on Sunday, so putting that up is on the weekend agenda. Then, I can’t wait to figure out what will be next!

Programming note: My wonderful cousin made some adjustments to try and prevent pictures from appearing sideways on phones/tablets. They appear correct on the computer, which confuses things. I don’t seem to be able to go back and fix pictures in the old posts, but as I’m about to hit “publish” I’m hopeful everything will be facing the right way.

A Smattering of Stuff

Quick unrelated note: It seems that my pictures are appearing sideways on some platforms. I am working to fix it and in the meantime, I apologize.

Hello! Hoping 2019 is treating you well so far. Due to weather and the ongoing garage insulation project, I’ve been working on a smattering of stuff. It’s all good, and I am getting some small things done, but I know what my next project will be and I’m super anxious to get started on it. I definitely need Mother Nature to cooperate a bit more.

I’m trying to expand the food repertoire a little and cooked a new recipe from Pinch of Yum, Vegetarian Swedish Meatballs. It was amazing. I loved it and ate way too much, and wanted there to be way more leftovers than there were. Somehow I didn’t end up with as much sauce as I think I should have, so will make more next time.

Did I mention that I LOVED THIS DISH?!?!?

An exciting shop related item is that I bought a random orbital sander. I opted for corded vs adding to my cordless collection for two reasons. When I picked up the RIDGID cordless sander, it was heavy. Once I added the battery, it would have been WAY heavy. I didn’t think I would be able to manage it for an extended period of time. Once I made that decision, I tried the grips of the corded sanders. I have pretty small hands, so it matters. I chose the DEWALT because the grip was the best and they have a great reputation.

I follow Gator Finishing on Instagram and really enjoy their feed, so decided to support them with my first sandpaper disc purchase.

Since we built the lumber storage rack, it has been used as a quick repository. We’ve tossed many (mostly smaller) pieces of wood in there along the way, and the disorganization shows. I decided to use some of the wicked weather condition time to try to inventory and organize the cart. I did a post on Instagram asking any woodworkers out there how specific they were with inventory, but only received a few responses.

After I pulled all of the smaller pieces out, I actually measured and logged most of them. Maybe that’s weird. I did figure out that I have a bunch of the wood for my next bigger build already, which is fun.

Two final items. Our headboard, and part of Tim, were featured in a Weatherwash ad. I was ridiculously excited.

And last, I’ve been taking part in the Yoga With Adriene 30 Day Dedicate program. It was a recommendation from the youngest, and randomly echoed by a few other friends. I have really enjoyed it, more than I ever would have thought. Fargo has been doing way better than me in his stretching and relaxation though.

Making Stuff With Wood: 2018 Review

Although my “making stuff with wood” journey began at the end of 2017, it really became a passion in 2018. I thought it would be fun to do a recap of what Tim and I made in the past year. He helped a ton in the beginning, and any time I asked for assistance/guidance after that. I did more and more on my own as the year went on. I linked to the posts where I talked more in depth about each.

Go big or go home I guess as we sure started with a big one…workbench:

Next up…miter saw cart:

We combined a few plans and added our own touches to a lumber storage cart:

No sense starting small with the non workshop projects either…queen bed frame:

And corbel lights to match:

I did some smaller projects along the way, some from plans and some that I put together on my own (with varying degrees of success). Most were decorated with some wood burned designs:

Finished up with nightstands, also to match the bed, for which I was chosen as a Weatherwash Ambassador (I submitted a project proposal and it was accepted). It was super freaking exciting as I have used Weatherwash on almost everything here.

I can’t wait to tell you all about the upcoming furniture/house/woodcraft projects and to take you along on my learning journey…once the shop (garage) is done.

 

Nightstand Love

As I mentioned in a prior post, I built two nightstands. I built them mostly by myself, once Tim helped me get started.I am really proud of myself and I learned a lot through these builds. I used Ana White’s Mini Farmhouse Bedside Table plan with some modifications.

Some of this is repeat from the previous nightstand post, so feel free to skip if you read that one. I used 1×6 tongue and groove for the tops because this is what we used on the headboard and I wanted it to match. We used 1×8 tongue and groove, smooth side up, for the bottom shelves. If you viewed the original plan, you would see that there was a board set in between the horizontal supports. I just didn’t think that it would match the look I wanted. I probably could have used the jig saw on the originally called for shelf boards to set them on top of the horizontal supports, like I did with the the tongue and groove, but I’m really happy with it this way.

I used the same Weatherwash PINED stain, Clear Maintenance Oil, and Flat Varnish that I used on the bed frame. The color is beautiful. The second one came out richer/darker, which could be from using a new can of stain, or variations in the wood we purchased. I love them both!

Here are some finished pictures I took with the fancy camera.

The only thing I’m pondering about doing differently with my next build, is staining before assembling. Even having a tiny brush nearby didn’t make me feel like I could get stain into all of the joint areas. This may be because not all of my joints are dead on. So, assuming I improve in that area, it wouldn’t be an issue in the future. I think I’ll try it anyway.

 

Smaller Pieces Out of Wood

As promised, late, but getting done, I wanted to share pictures of some of the smaller pieces I’ve been working on. I had a bunch of leftover 1x4s from the bed, and some leftover 1×12 from the nightstands since I didn’t use it for the bottom shelves. I used it for the following, using inspiration from some of the AMAZING woodworkers I follow online and on Instagram.

Completely unrelated is that my phone died. I lost some pictures, unfortunately, and I’m not quite over the learning hump with the new phone. I’m figuring out that some of the pictures I took with the new phone are on a super small setting and are blurring a little when I make them larger. Sorry, it’s not your eyes, it’s the pictures.

Here are pieces ready to be Weatherwashed for two trays, a centerpiece box, a wine tote and a beer tote.

Below is one of the many display ideas I tried in a tray photo shoot.

Here is the centerpiece box. I have battery operated pillar candles that I can picture in there with seasonal additions.

I also built a Shanty-2-Chic inspired wine rack. I used the Weatherwash Pined and Clear Maintenance Oil (I used it on the box above and the Rusted stain on the tray). I woodburned two designs, three of one and two of the the other.

Lots of pocket hole action using the Kreg jig.

Final product (with a very rare blue sky background)!

And something really, really exciting is my early Hanukkah, Christmas, Anniversary present. After a TON of research and review reading, I now own pretty RIDGID Power Tools! Still a few I want to add to the collection, but woooooooot!!!

 

 

Nightstands So Far

Hi all. Been keeping super busy here. I’m building nightstands, painting the basement, trying to be a little creative on my own by using scrap wood to make decorative, rustic trays and centerpiece boxes. I have been so inspired by the makers/woodworkers I follow on Instagram. Although I have a mile long list of things I want to make, I’m feeling pretty good about the productivity level, and I’m never without something to work on.

I have one nightstand assembled, thanks to help from Tim. I think Fargo approves.

We used the same tongue and groove for the top that we used for the headboard. We thought that would tie it all together nicely.

One of the most challenging parts for me, was to cut the bottom shelf out around the legs. I didn’t think the original design for the shelf really fit the look I am going for, so I used upside down, wider tongue and groove. Out came the jigsaw, and…

Not too shabby, eh? SQUEEEEEE!!!!!

The other challenging part was building that drawer. It was a first drawer build for Tim too, but we figured it out together. I know it’s repetitive, but I was ridiculously excited when the drawer fit well.

I’m working on the second nightstand now. I’ve done all of the assembly work so far on the second one SOLO! I’m really proud of this, it’s a huge step.  I employed the use of clamps along the way.

Lots of pocket holes in this build, so I’m loving the Kreg Jig! You can see the Weatherwash in the background, which I also love. This morning I used PINED on the first nightstand in order to match the bed. It’s way too windy to move the miter saw into the driveway and finish building the second one, so I figured I’d stain the first. I’ll have an updated post with the rest of the nightstand pictures soon. I’ll also have a post with the assorted other items I’ve been putting together.

I’ll leave you with Fargo The Terrible, keeping me company while I build. Good thing I make sure he has a comfy place to rest.

Corbel Lights To Match the Bed

I definitely have a few favorite furniture project sites at this point. A few months ago, I was scrolling through project ideas and I saw the Corbel Sconce Light by Shanty-2-Chic.Tim and I agreed that these would be a great compliment to the new bed frame. Have I mentioned that WE BUILT A BED?!?

I started with leftover 2x4s, ordered the lights and cages online, and found bulbs at Lowes.

In order to match the bed, I used the same Weatherwash PINED Aging Stain, Clear Maintenance Oil and Satin Varnish that is on the bed. I really love love love the way the wood looks after using this combination. It’s also pretty darn fast and easy. On the left is the wood just after applying the stain, on the right is after drying for an hour.

Using Tim’s ideas, we made a few changes. We used a router for the first time and made a (too large but workable) channel in the back of the upright piece. Instead of the cord being in front of that piece, it would go up the back and be less prominent.

That led to drilling a hole just on top of the perpendicular piece to bring the cord through, instead of it laying over the top. What we didn’t think of, until assembly, was that Tim had to detach the cord from the light in order to feed it through the hole, then re-attach it.

It was worth that extra step. We love how they turned out!

The cost estimate from Shanty-2-Chic is $25/each. Using leftover pieces of wood helped, but that estimate is a little low depending on the light bulbs you choose. We went with the “vintage” looking bulbs, which were $10/bulb. This raised our total cost to closer to $30.

Tea Light Centerpiece

Let me start by apologizing to anyone who might read this and then get one of these for the holidays.

I saw this project a few months ago, on the same site that I found the plans for the beer totes I made. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience with sanding, and I learned about forstner drill bits. We were lucky enough to end up with a hand-me-down drill press, so I learned how to use one of those as well. One note, is that I had to seek out a 1 5/8″ bit because the 1 1/2″ in the instructions just wasn’t quite big enough.

On top of all of that, a friend/co-worker asked if I’d ever tried wood burning, which I hadn’t. I’ve now started playing with that skill, at the most basic level, and I am combining it with the tea light centerpieces.

This has been a fun thing to mix in between the big bed project an the upcoming complementary bed projects. I’m trying different finishes, including the same Weatherwash Pined Aging Stain I used on the bed. I really love that stuff.

One coat of Weatherwash, still need to add the oil and varnish. This one is plain, no woodburning. I love how the Weatherwash accentuates the grain and knots.

With candles.

This one has Early American and Cherry stain on it.

I’m trying to figure out the best pairing of finish with the woodburning. I have a few more to try.