Headboard Number 2

Here is the post I promised, with more details about the headboard and nightstand I built for a friend. The past two weeks I have been immersed in The Builders Challenge, which is one of the reasons this post has been delayed. I will definitely be telling you all more about it soon.

When my friend approached me about building a headboard, and then a nightstand, I was excited at the chance to expand my building experiences. She chose two Ana White build plans, so a familiar style. Each piece had new (to me) aspects and challenges. An additional challenge was maneuvering around the still not quite finished shop/garage work.

Given my positive experiences with Weatherwash, I offered that as a finishing option, and she chose Rusted. I had read that most people like two coats, and I followed that recommendation. It really came out pretty.

The Simple Bed Plan headboard had slats that needed to be evenly spaced across the span of the horizontal boards. It took me a good amount of time checking and rechecking the measurements.

The center section came out looking great and was Fargo approved!

Probably the biggest hurdle was attaching that section to the uprights. The directions said to drill sideways, from the outside, through the 4×4 posts and into the vertical pieces. Tim helped me on this part and, not only could we not get a sturdy hold, but the screws broke off in the process of tightening. I thought the headboard was toast and I was going to have to salvage what I could and start over. Tim was great and he was able to saw the screws to detach the post. All I needed to do was an additional post, the center section was fine.

Between the two of us, we came up with the idea to add an additional cross piece, underneath the center section and we used pocket holes to very solidly attach it. the center section then had something to sit on, AND, best part, it actually tied beautifully into the design.

This piece is heavy and solid and I love the grain and knots in it. My next post will focus on the nightstand, which included drawer slides to mix things up.

Building a Bed–Part II

Fair warning, this is a long post.

When Ana White stained her bed, she used Varathane Weathered Wood Accelerator. We really liked the look of her bed, so we started researching this product. According to reviews, it seemed that quite a few people were ending up with a purple/blue color that they didn’t like. Given that feedback, we opted to research other wood aging stain products. Weatherwash had positive reviews, colors looked solid and it sounded like a good one to try.

After reading about the products on their site, I ordered the Pined Aging Stain and the Clear Maintenance Oil. The Oil is supposed to mellow the grey tones and bring out more of the warmer tones. I later bought the varnish because I originally misunderstood about how all three products work together.

Here is the headboard before (I know you can see the unstained pictures in the previous post, but here it is anyway), and after, one coat of the stain. Loved it!! It does look different on different wood types so do test spots on each type of wood first. There are three different woods in this headboard. .

Footboard and side rails.

It was dark outside when I applied a coat of oil, so I only have one bad picture of the before/after oil. I opted for the clear oil, but there is also a white oil, that lightens the stain. It totally beautified the wood even more, and I loved it!

Post oil footboard and rails. Ignore the areas where I needed to sand a little more than I realized and just look at the tones and how beautifully the grains show.

A few mornings ago, at my ridiculous 5:00 am get things done time, I used the varnish. Here is a garage shot of the headboard and footboard with stain, oil and varnish. We chose the flat varnish for this project, we weren’t looking for a super shiny finish.

Big excitement night before last, because…WE ASSEMBLED! Some of these pictures are from assembly night with poor lighting, and a few are from the next day, with the fancy camera.

One of my biggest fears was that the frame wouldn’t fit together well. It did! Because it is mostly heavy 2x4s and 2x6s, we had to carry everything upstairs separately and do all the assembly in the bedroom.

Fargo inspected our work as we progressed. He felt we did a solid job adding the cleats, the center support and had a good start on the slats. I am very glad we somehow ended up buying an extra 2×4. I cut the center support at the same 80″ as the cleats, but that ended up being too short. I would have been bummed if we’d had to wait until we could get out to buy another 2×4 to finish.

GAHHHHHH!!!!!! It’s done!!!!! I may have shed a tear of joy.

I wish the pictures could really portray how beautifully it turned out. If our room was a little larger, I might have been able to get better angles for entire bed shots, but the partials will have to do.

Following are some reflections on things I would probably do differently, besides sand a little more. I would make the frame an an inch or two higher, so the mattress sets up just a bit higher. For our bedroom, I’d probably take the top of the headboard down one panel, as our ceiling is fairly low. Our old mattress was about 4″ taller than the new one we bought (jury is still out on whether we like the new mattress), and if I had known this, I would have taken that panel from the top and put it on the bottom so no “pillow falling through” space existed. These are really just specific to our bedroom, and my learning curve.

Have I mentioned how proud I am of this bed?!?!? Honestly, one of my favorite parts was working with Tim. I’ve chronicled on this blog that empty nest has been hard for me. Tim has always had his outdoor hobbies, but I have been searching for something to feel passionate about. I have enjoyed baking and cooking and some of the other hobbies I’ve tried along the way, but I LOVED creating the workbench, the miter saw cart, the lumber storage cart and THIS BED. I love that Tim enjoyed working on all of these things with me. Although there is so much more to learn, I now have enough skill and knowledge base to do a lot on my own and keep me moving.  I greatly appreciate Tim’s participation and help when I want/need it, and I appreciate that he enjoys helping me. Can’t wait to get started on the next project!

 

 

 

Building A Bed

As I mentioned in the previous post, I have a HUGE list of what I want to build/make. I really have no idea, now that I think about it, how “bed frame” rose to the top of the list. The bed frame we have is probably close to 20 years old, and it was not top of the line when we bought it. I think that I was looking through all of the online plans from my favorite woodworking bloggers and I loved so many of the bed frames.

I brought Tim into the decision process and we narrowed it down. Then, when I was looking at the Modern Farmhouse Bed on Ana White’s website, I saw there was a video about making this bed that went along with the plans. We enjoyed the video, and the extra Alaskan scenery she includes in each one and that helped with our decision.

We still have 2x6s, 16′ 2x6s, on the floor in the garage, so we didn’t need to buy of those.  This is the original pile we took out of the garage to sort back in July.

Most of the 2x4s and some of the 2x6s went to the workbench, miter saw cart and lumber storage rack. But there are still plenty of 2x6s, and other assorted sizes and types in the garage, just waiting to be used in something awesome.

For the headboard, we opted to use tongue and groove vs plain 1x6s.  We went with 1x4s for the slats vs 2x4s. This bed was going to be super heavy duty to begin with and we felt like 2x4s for the slats would be overkill.

After talking through the plans with the Tim, I did all of the cutting and the pocket hole drilling and some of the assembly myself. I greatly appreciated that he found projects in and around the garage to work on so that he was available any time that I needed him. Some of the pieces were just too heavy for me to maneuver and fasten by myself. Some of the wood was too hard for me to get the 2 1/2″ wood screws into (though I’m improving).

Wearing my Rosies overalls, which I love, with the ear protectors hanging on the string and the safety glasses. I am totally looking the part! I’m also super proud of how the headboard behind me is coming along.

I introduced Tim to the Kreg Jig and to pocket holes after I learned about them on the Shanty-2-Chic site. They have a great instructional video . I love drilling them and I think it’s such a cool way to join wood together. On our lumber cart, we had one whoops where the pocket holes ended up on the outside, but overall, it’s gone well.

Footboard and side rails.

I used a palm sander and I recently read about tack cloths, so I used those too. Helpful hint, wear rubber gloves with the tack cloth because the tack stuff does not want to wash off hands. I actually enjoyed the sanding, but I had a learning curve with that too. Our bed frame is far from perfect in the sanding department, but since I wanted a weathered/beaten look, it is fine for this project. I love that I’m learning so much each time we make something.

I’ll stop here. The next post will cover the finishing process, and hopefully, an assembled picture. Assembly is on the docket for this week since the mattress we purchased, after spending way too many hours researching, arrived today.